Conservation planning Indigenous partnerships

Watching, Listening, and Learning to Understand Change - Developing a Community-Based Monitoring (CBM) Initiative in Ontario's Far North

Raygorodetsky, G. and Chetkiewicz, C.


Abstract

Ontario’s Far North is one of the world’s largest most intact expanses of boreal forest and wetlands. The region has almost no industrial development today. Far from being a frontier for new mines, all-weather roads, and transmission, the region is the homeland of Cree and Ojibway Indigenous peoples. They rely on the land, freshwater, air, fish and wildlife for traditional economies and cultural and spiritual values. They are also engaged in environmental planning for new industrial development and climate change. As such, impacts of climate change and development decisions on communities and their traditional territories, must be monitored. Our report develops the rationale for the design and implementation of a community-based monitoring approach in Ontario’s Far North and looks at examples from across Canada and around the world in order to support First Nations in their roles and responsibilities in taking care of the land, water, fish, and wildlife.

Recommended citation

Raygorodetsky, G. and Chetkiewicz, C. (2017). Watching, Listening, and Learning to Understand Change - Developing a Community-Based Monitoring (CBM) Initiative in Ontario's Far North. WCS Canada. https://library.wcs.org/doi/ctl/view/mid/33065/pubid/DMX3398200000.aspx

Cheryl Chetkiewicz

Cheryl Chetkiewicz

Director, Indigenous Communities and Conservation

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