Climate change

Warming drives poleward range contractions of Beringian endemic plant species at high latitudes

Oke, T.A., Stralberg, D., Reid, D.G., Bennett, B.A., Cannings, S., Willier, C., Fulkerson, J.R., Cooke, H.A. and Mantyka‐Pringle, C.S.


Abstract

Species are expected to disperse poleward in response to climate change. For species that are endemic to the high latitudes, this implies that many in the future would face a “no-where-to-go” situation as they are currently occupying the northernmost portion of the continent. Further, because endemism may arise from a combination of physical barriers, climate and geological history, the persistence of many species may require spatial matching of multiple environmental factors within a limited dispersal space. Thus, it is not clear how endemic species might spatially adjust their distributions in response to climate change and whether there are future climate change refugia for these species.

Key points

Recommended citation

Oke, T.A., Stralberg, D., Reid, D.G., Bennett, B.A., Cannings, S., Willier, C., Fulkerson, J.R., Cooke, H.A. and Mantyka‐Pringle, C.S. (2023). Warming drives poleward range contractions of Beringian endemic plant species at high latitudes. Diversity and Distributions. https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.13674

Donald Reid

Donald Reid

Emeritus Scientist

Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle

Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle

Co-Director, Northern Boreal Mountains Program

Hilary Cooke

Hilary Cooke

Co-Director, Northern Boreal Mountains Program

Wild species’ survival should shape National Biodiversity Strategy

Wild species’ survival should shape National Biodiversity Strategy

In Montreal in 2022, Canada committed to halt and reverse nature loss by 2030. The federal government is developing a National Biodiversity Strategy, due later this year, to outline how this commitment can be achieved. Such a strategy is direly needed.
Daniel Kraus