Arctic Climate change Whales and seals

The Arctic marine soundscape of the Amundsen Gulf, Western Canadian Arctic

Dingwall, J., Halliday, W., Diogou, N., Niemi, A., Steiner, N., Insley, S.


The underwater soundscape, a habitat component for Arctic marine mammals, is shifting.

Abstract

The underwater soundscape, a habitat component for Arctic marine mammals, is shifting. We examined the drivers of the underwater soundscape at three sites in the Amundsen Gulf, Northwest Territories, Canada from 2018 to 2019 and estimated the contribution of abiotic and biotic sources between 20 Hz and 24 kHz. Higher wind speeds and the presence of bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) vocalizations led to increased SPL (0.41 dB/km/h and 3.87 dB, respectively), while higher ice concentration and air temperature led to decreased SPL (−0.39 dB/% and − 0.096 dB/°C, respectively). Other marine mammals did not significantly impact the ambient soundscape. The presence of vessel traffic led to increased SPLs (12.37 dB) but was quieter at distances farther from the recorder (−2.57 dB/log m). The presence of high frequency and broadband signals produced by ice led to increased SPLs (7.60 dB and 10.16 dB, respectively).

Key points

Recommended citation

Dingwall, J., Halliday, W., Diogou, N., Niemi, A., Steiner, N., Insley, S. (2024). The Arctic marine soundscape of the Amundsen Gulf, Western Canadian Arctic. Marine Pollution Bulletin. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2024.116510

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William Halliday

Conservation Scientist/Arctic Acoustics Program Lead

Stephen Insley

Stephen Insley

 Director of Arctic Conservation

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