Taking it slow can help reduce impacts of Arctic shipping on whales


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Whales and seals Arctic

Published

2018-08-18

Significantly increased ship traffic is altering the submarine calm of one of the quietest places on Earth.

  • Thanks to climate change, traveling through the Northwest Passage is quickly becoming an exotic option for cruise ship passengers — and an enticing shortcut for cargo ships.
  • But an increasingly ice-free Arctic means more than just a chance for a new sightseeing adventure: Significantly increased ship traffic is altering the submarine calm of one of the quietest places on Earth. That could have serious implications for marine mammals and fish that rely on sound for group cohesion, socializing, finding mates, navigating, and detecting threats.
  • As we grow sensitive to plastics and other toxins that plague ocean species, we must remember that while noise is the one form of pollution that we cannot see, we can work together to turn down the volume.

Read the rest of the commentary on the Mongabay site.

Documenting the impacts of underwater noise

Documenting the impacts of underwater noise

Addressing impacts from shipping and climate change in the western Arctic

A whale of a problem developing in Canada’s Arctic

A whale of a problem developing in Canada’s Arctic

Canada actually borders three oceans and it is in that often overlooked third ocean—the Arctic—that the fate of whales could become the next marine crisis for Ottawa.
William Halliday

Protecting Whales in an Ice-free Arctic

Protecting Whales in an Ice-free Arctic

As Arctic sea ice vanishes, new measures are needed to protect marine wildlife from increased ship traffic