Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) perfectly blending in with sandy river bottoms & sandy lake shoals of its habitat., Alan Dextrase
Eastern Sand Darter (Ammocrypta pellucida) perfectly blending in with sandy river bottoms & sandy lake shoals of its habitat. © Alan Dextrase

Key Biodiversity Areas

Canada's critical places for nature

How we work

KBAs are sites that contribute to the persistence of biodiversity nationally and globally. Found across land, freshwater, and marine environments, KBAs support rare and threatened species and ecosystems, as well as key natural processes. They range in size from small patches of habitat to large tracts of land or water.

KBAs are designated based on specific, measurable criteria. The designation does not give the site a particular management prescription or legal status. KBAs may encompass private or public land, sometimes overlapping, partially or entirely, with legally protected sites.

The KBA Program strives to ensure that sites are properly identified, their values are well documented and effectively managed, and that these places are adequately safeguarded and receive appropriate resources.

Where we work

WCS Canada focuses on KBAs across Canada as part of the KBA Canada partnership.

Resources


Stories and op-eds

What the State of Whales tells us about conservation in Canada
2024-04-04

What the State of Whales tells us about conservation in Canada

Over half of Canada’s 40 whale species remain at some level of extinction risk.
Daniel Kraus, William Halliday, Stephen Insley
A powerful new approach to nature conservation in Canada
2022-10-03

A powerful new approach to nature conservation in Canada

Canada is a big place. There are tens of thousands of lakes in this country, including some of the largest in the world.
Lina Cordero
Thinking big to conserve small but important species
2020-05-21

Thinking big to conserve small but important species

Through the Key Biodiversity Area (KBA) program, lesser-known and sometimes rare and endemic (restricted to a particular location) species are finally getting their due.
Ciara Raudsepp-Hearne

Media coverage

Rare moss designated key biodiversity area in Quttinirpaaq National Park

Canada’s northernmost park is home to pockets of a moss called “Porsild’s Bryum”, a “species at risk”
2024-04-29 | Nunavut News

‘She’s out here trailblazing’: these 10 Black environmentalists are building community

Peter Soroye is now a conservation biologist in Ottawa with Wildlife Conservation Society Canada, identifying key areas for preserving biodiversity.
2024-02-06 | The Narwhal

Our team

Ciara Raudsepp-Hearne

Ciara Raudsepp-Hearne

Director of Key Biodiversity Areas

Thomas Komarniski

Thomas Komarniski

Key Biodiversity Areas Indigenous Outreach Associate

Angela Leung

Angela Leung

KBA Quality Control Coordinator

Chloé Debyser

Chloé Debyser

KBA Canada Technical Coordinator

Colin Chapman

Colin Chapman

 Nova Scotia KBA Coordinator

Ian Adams

Ian Adams

BC KBA Regional Coordinator

Peter Soroye

Peter Soroye

Key Biodiversity Areas Assessment and Outreach Coordinator

Lucy Poley

Lucy Poley

Canada KBA Ecosystems Criteria Coordinator

Zachary Moore

Zachary Moore

Manitoba KBA Regional Coordinator

Jessica Reid

Jessica Reid

Key Biodiversity Areas Research Intern


Press releases

A tiny gem hidden on a High Arctic island takes the spotlight
2024-02-13

A tiny gem hidden on a High Arctic island takes the spotlight

In a steep gully at the head of a fiord on Ellesmere Island grows a moss that forms small brilliant green colonies that have a distinctive “sparkly” appearance.
Southwestern Ontario’s “backyard” gets national recognition as stronghold for wildlife
2024-01-05

Southwestern Ontario’s “backyard” gets national recognition as stronghold for wildlife

Despite centuries of agriculture and urban development, two natural areas in southern Ontario have gained national recognition for their importance to nature.
New report shows Canada’s trees in growing trouble
2023-03-26

New report shows Canada’s trees in growing trouble

Almost one-quarter of tree species now at risk