Peatlands in the Hudson Bay Lowland – the world’s second-largest peatland complex and one of the world’s largest terrestrial carbon stores., Lorna Harris
Peatlands in the Hudson Bay Lowland – the world’s second-largest peatland complex and one of the world’s largest terrestrial carbon stores. © Lorna Harris

Forests, Peatlands & Climate Change

We envision a world where the vast and carbon-rich forests and peatlands of North America’s boreal and arctic remain ecologically intact.

How we work

WCS Canada is leading new partnerships and working collaboratively with researchers, Indigenous organisations and communities, and government and industry partners to:

  • generate data to fill knowledge gaps;
  • support Indigenous-led approaches to conservation; and using our scientific data and expertise;
  • identify and advocate for improved legislation, policy and land-use planning for forests and peatlands at different governance levels across Canada.

Where we work

  1. Regional – in the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL), the Yukon, and other priority regions.
  2. National – across the boreal and arctic of North America; and
  3. Global – by contributing our data and expertise to advance the conservation of high-integrity peatlands and forests, in collaboration with global partners, including the WCS High-Integrity Peatlands Initiative.

Resources


Stories and op-eds

Ignoring Canada’s peatlands is a catastrophe in the making
2022-12-14

Ignoring Canada’s peatlands is a catastrophe in the making

Canada has one-quarter of the world’s peatlands within its borders, storing more carbon than the Amazon Rainforest.
Lorna Harris
Peatlands: Vital for carbon storage and stewardship
2020-08-05

Peatlands: Vital for carbon storage and stewardship

Peatlands are finally getting some overdue respect.
Justina Ray, Meg Southee

Media coverage

Inside Canada’s fight to save its peatlands

2023-06-27 | The Weather Network

How peatlands on the Prairies are at risk from climate change

"Peatlands are one of the world's largest terrestrial carbon stores because they've been taking in carbon for thousands and thousands of years and storing it there."
2023-04-24 | CBC

Our team

Lorna Harris

Lorna Harris

Director of Forests, Peatlands and Climate Change Program

Adam Kirkwood

Adam Kirkwood

Research Associate

Victoria Goodday

Victoria Goodday

Policy Analyst - Natural Climate Solutions