Our team

William Halliday

Conservation Scientist/Arctic Acoustics Program Lead

Western Arctic

Bill is a Conservation Scientist and the Arctic Acoustics lead in WCS Canada’s Arctic Beringia Program.

He is based in Victoria, and works closely with Dr. Steve Insley in WCS Canada’s Whitehorse office, as well as with Dr. Francis Juanes at the University of Victoria. Bill studies marine mammals and fish in the western Canadian Arctic using passive acoustic monitoring (i.e. underwater listening). He examines how climate change and vessel traffic influence these animals, and is particularly interested in underwater noise pollution and the development of effective marine spatial planning.

Bill has a strong background in quantitative ecology, with a specialization on habitat selection and animal behaviour, including four years of experience working at remote field sites in the Arctic on lemmings. Previously, Bill was a post-doctoral fellow with WCS Canada, completed his PhD at the University of Ottawa, and his MSc and BSc at Lakehead University.

Resources


Stories and op-eds

What the State of Whales tells us about conservation in Canada
2024-04-04

What the State of Whales tells us about conservation in Canada

Over half of Canada’s 40 whale species remain at some level of extinction risk.
Daniel Kraus, William Halliday, Stephen Insley
Scouting for Sound in the Arctic Depths
2023-11-15

Scouting for Sound in the Arctic Depths

Our Western Arctic team is tracking the performance of a new listening device – a “glider” that can roam beneath the water’s surface picking up sounds and other ocean state information.
William Halliday
A library full of sound: How a new collection of underwater sounds will help protect marine life
2022-05-16

A library full of sound: How a new collection of underwater sounds will help protect marine life

Forget that rule about keeping quiet in the library. I want my library to be full of noise, including sounds from a world that is mostly invisible to human eyes: the ocean.
William Halliday

Media coverage

'Like being at a loud rock concert': study looks at how ship noise affects Arctic marine mammals

"Whales are swimming faster when ships are close by ... and we're finding changes in the sound that they're making in their vocalizations," said William Halliday, the lead researcher for the study.
2023-12-26 | CBC

William Halliday on increased shipping in the Beaufort Sea

2023-12-19 | CBC - The Trailbreaker with Hilary Bird

, W. Halliday
© W. Halliday
Areas of expertise
Whales and seals Arctic